Overgrown Amazon

desirabilityQuick-UX provides for the rapid, simple and quantifiable assessment of a product’s User Experience (UX). In answering the question of Desirability, “Do I want to use it?” the sub-category of Aesthetics is one of frequent discussion, especially in the latest wave of online products and how they handle content presentation and interaction.

Today, in the same spirit of Quick-UX, let’s take a quick look at an Internet product with an Aesthetic value of 0.

Example: Overload (value = 0)

01_amazon

Amazon implemented a good deal of my advice regarding their User Experience, but still suffers from information overload, and an Aesthetic variable value of 0. The tangled experience has too many gaudy interactions, from spinning to intrusive drop-downs, as well as other elements that (sometimes) popup, seemingly out of nowhere. Amazon needs to focus on the minimal, clean implementation of the site content with experience augmenting mouse-user interactions enhancing Desirability. Transitions and other content presentation and interactions should be enjoyable additions, not the troublesome hindrances that most are today.

Dropdowns can be experienced sometimes unexpectedly popping open when traversing from one region of the page, increasing the noise / interruption and detracting from any strands of simplicity that may exist.

02_amazon_popup

Instead of being able to simply interact with and browse content, somewhat randomly, a spinning element will be presented to the user containing a grouping of products. This results in a more complex, non-minimalistic presentation of the content, the products – providing an excessively animated, gaudy user interface device.

03_amazon_spinning

Over the course of this series I am providing real-world examples of Aesthetics values…

Clean, Sharp, Pleasing, and Enjoyable (value 2)

Incomplete (value 1)

Overload (value 0)

Subscribe now (click here) to make sure you don’t miss any part of this series exploring the Desirability and Aesthetics of Quick-UX, the quick and easy method of generating quantifiable and comparable metrics representing the understanding of the overall User Experience of a product, as well as other insightful posts from The Product Guy.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

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About Jeremy Horn

Jeremy Horn is an award-winning, product management veteran with thirteen years of experience leading and managing product teams. Jeremy has held various executive and advisory roles, from founder of several start-ups to driving diverse organizations in online services, consumer products, and social media. As founder of The Product Group, he has created the largest product management meetup in the world and hosts the annual awarding of The Best Product Person. Jeremy can currently be found pioneering the next generation of content management and sharing at Viacom, acting as creator and instructor of the 10-week product management course at General Assembly, and mentoring at Women 2.0 and Lean Startup Machine. Follow Jeremy on twitter @theproductguy or his blog at http://tpgblog.com.

6 thoughts on “Overgrown Amazon

  1. Pingback: Ripening FreshDirect « The Product Guy

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  3. Pingback: On the Aesthetics of Quick-UX « The Product Guy

  4. With all due respect, if I were to criticize the UX of one of the most successful websites in the world, I would begin by first working on the UX of my own site – lest the readers label my content as nothing more than another episode of a pot calling the kettle black.

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  5. Amazon can be quite a lot to deal with. I actually think that considering it’s size and scope it does a decent job.

    GoDaddy’s website is by far the worst. Moving around that side both before and after sign in is an astoundingly complicated endeavor.

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