12 Rules for Building Your Product Management Playbook

Business strategy businessman holding a blackboard planning team strategy on a chalk drawing of a so

In a recent live stream from one of our mentors of The Product Mentor, Ian Moulton, lead a conversation around “Building Your Product Management Playbook”.  We are always looking for more product mentors from all around the world.  Signup to be a Mentor Today!

View the live stream…

 

About The Product Mentor

The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Mentors and Mentees from around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A

Signup to be a Mentor Today!

Throughout the program, each mentor leads a conversation in an area of their expertise that is live streamed and available to both mentee and the broader product community.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

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Reconciling Product Management and Product Leadership

Guest Post by: Lamia Benhaddou (Mentee, Session 4, The Product Mentor) [Paired with Mentor, Amanda Ralph]

A Product manager tasked to lead and manage her team while still providing product management capabilities; that was my position when I was selected to be part of the product mentorship program and paired with Amanda Ralph, my new mentor. Amanda had 18 years of product management experience and was able to clearly foresee the obstacles I might encounter in my new role.

We started by defining the objectives I wanted to achieve over the course of my 6 months in the product mentor program, an important exercise at the beginning of any mentor partnership. I identified with my mentor Amanda, the areas that I needed to support in order to still deliver product management capabilities not only as a product manager but as a team; a team which I now lead.  

Indeed the role of a product leader is different to that of a product manager. A product leader not only has to manage products but also to guide and direct the overall product strategy and team, and ensure that products are delivered to market.

If you are stepping in a new role involving more responsibilities you will find in this article 3 essential points to consider for a smoother career transition.

Restructuring the Team

When thinking about my new role and what needs to be delivered, I establish that the team needs to be restructured in order to better align and deliver products to market and, to enable me to consolidate my new role as both product manager and people leader. In addition to restructuring the team I also need to focus on empowering and enabling my team to take greater ownership and accountability for managing and delivering the products.

Here are the key points to take into account when defining the new structure and capabilities of the team:

The 4 steps to empower the team

1/ Draw a mind map of all the product management capabilities that I am delivering as a product manager and identify the ones that can be transferred to the team.

2/ Assess the capabilities of the team by meeting every team member individually to understand both their capabilities and aspirations. In these meetings, I try to understand the current challenges each individual faces and how they can grow in this team.

3/ Do a matrix of skills to map team member skills and identify development opportunities. Identify both formal training opportunities and projects which give team members the chance to apply newly acquired skills in their day-to-day activities and develop their role.  

4/ Establish a training program for every team member or by team functions. This training set can be composed of workshops where I can transfer my product management knowledge (e.g. how to write user stories, stakeholder management, how to define value proposition). Allow for workshops where team members from other teams are invited to give a presentation (e.g., basics of project management by a project manager, etc.)

Facilitating better team collaboration

With less time on hand, it is important to develop procedures with the team that will fast track collaboration and delivery. Ensure that the communication between designers, developers and producers is optimal. The Scrum ceremonies (Sprint planning, Standups, etc.) and kick-off meetings of a new project are a good way to ensure that. Holding regular Agile retrospectives can be very useful in this regard and allow a safer communication to happen within the team.

At the end of the day, your job is to ship the right product to the users. I encourage then the team to have a greater understanding of the users. This can be done for example by involving the developers and product owners in the user research, the wireframes assessment and the usability testing sessions.  

Resource management

A new leadership role is also a good opportunity to assess and evaluate whether you have the right skill sets and resource capacity in your team.  It is impractical to continue to do your old role as well as lead the team. So you need to assess whether there are opportunities within the team for individuals to step up and take on more responsibility or whether you need to bring additional resources into the team.

Stakeholder engagement

By taking on more responsibilities, I need to demonstrate leadership and gain the confidence and trust of my stakeholders.

Engage effectively the stakeholders

The product manager is the link between the internal/external stakeholders and the team. Identify your stakeholders, analyse and engage with them effectively by using the power grid by Roman Pichler, which Amanda shared with me. This is a relative quick exercise and the matrix can be adjusted over time. With this matrix set, I can then for each product save time by inviting the right people to the discussion.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/AYp1eOFT4Y59U-QCvlf0zunpoEonY5ip23vS9HYNKZGYGI4JtuWkbmTu9F0KfI-uzUoOk7Fuo00D2CYuWTikMlhUegLaZNHXxfXApTQHSfPK5ExthkNdgrl7HTs5vo71l4WkGAtI

Draft procedures to get commitment

To ensure ongoing and active collaboration with stakeholders, it is important that procedures are defined and created together. For this, I define with my team the areas that can be improved, for example, handling Business As Usual requests which can be a source of frustration if they are not handled properly.

We start by drafting the ideal process with the producers and then refine them with key stakeholders’ input. At the end, we map a process that everyone can agree on. We implement then this procedure and iterate on it if necessary.

Educate stakeholders

Product management can be quite a new thing for businesses, especially technical product management. Some colleagues can be confused on what to expect from a technical product manager.

“Brown Bag” lunches can be a useful tactic to engage stakeholders and the wider business. They provide an opportunity to share your knowledge on product management capabilities (product planning, product strategy, UX lean methodology, product roadmap, etc.). This provides more clarity to stakeholders about what product management is, and where and how their expertise will be needed in the product development lifecycle.

Organize a product meeting

To get buy-in, you need to create a circle of trust with your stakeholders. For this to occur they need to be brought into the product development process. Establishing regular product meetings with key stakeholders to discuss current product roadmap and priorities is a great way to keep the business engaged and informed. As Rian Van Der Merwe explains it in Making it Right, these meetings enable us (managers and stakeholders) to ensure we are still working on the most important things. If something more important comes up, we prioritize it higher in the roadmap, and something else has to shift down; if stakeholders agree with the direction, we do nothing. If a new opportunity arises we can ask ourselves, “Is this the most important feature we are working on right now? Or is this something we should work on next? If so, what moves down the priority list?”

Monitor your productivity

When taking on more responsibilities, it is also important to review your current productivity. You need to constantly assess your physical, emotional and mental energy to be able to deliver against requirements without reaching the burnout.

I start every week by listing what I need to achieve. Throughout the day I use the Pomodoro technique to keep myself focused. One tip from Amanda is to block your calendar for 2 hours every day, especially in the morning where you know that you can achieve important tasks and let stakeholders invite you to meetings in the afternoon. Meetings don’t need to be conducted all the time in a meeting room. A walking meeting can be a good way to engage with stakeholders and keep their attention on the subject.

Setting time aside for yourself remains a critical part of the process. To keep balance I try to always do at least one physical activity per week. We also gather with a few colleagues to practice 10 to 15 minutes of guided meditation after lunch. Mindfulness increases focus, improves our ability to reduce stress, enhances clarity of mind and leadership effectiveness. The Search Inside yourself book provides a great practical introduction to mindful leadership.

Hopefully this list of tips will help you to find your way to transition from a Product Manager to a Product Leader and manage the balance of ‘doing’ (developing and shipping products) and ‘leading’ (day to day people and product portfolio leadership).

 

About Lamia Benhaddou
Lamia BenhaddouStarting as a web developer, Lamia’s journey through the digital space has come full circle, from managing large scale websites to coaching teams to adopt a more efficient product development with Scrum, and now in the education space with a particular emphasis on lean product management.

Lamia has also worked in a variety of contexts such as global organisations, startups, NGOs and is now the head of digital product for higher education provider Laureate Australia, bringing a UX focus to all digital sides of the business.

More About The Product Mentor
TPM-Short3-Logo4The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Management Mentors and Mentees around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A
  • Mentors and Mentees sharing their product management knowledge with the broader community

Sign up to be a Mentor today & join an elite group of product management leaders!

Check out the Mentors & Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

Not My Job

In a recent live stream from one of our mentors of The Product Mentor, Marc Wendell, lead a conversation around “Not My Job in the World of Product Management”.  We are always looking for more product mentors from all around the world.  Signup to be a Mentor Today!

View the live stream…

 

About The Product Mentor

The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Mentors and Mentees from around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A

Signup to be a Mentor Today!

Throughout the program, each mentor leads a conversation in an area of their expertise that is live streamed and available to both mentee and the broader product community.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

User Onboarding in Enterprise SaaS #prodmgmt

Guest Post by: Prakhar Agarwal (Mentee, Session 4, The Product Mentor) [Paired with Mentor, Sara Varki]

saas[1]Introduction

Nowadays, we all consume applications and platforms (software) over the web. “Software installation” is quickly becoming an old concept, especially for end users. Be it documents, photos, marketing, sales, or product, it’s all moving away from installing software on an operating system to just creating an account for a web-based service. This is the world of Software-as-a-Service (SaaS). Growth of SaaS companies in recent years has been explosive. Like all companies, these SaaS companies face several challenges broadly defined by the following three questions (along with the associated function of the company):

  • How do I get more visitors to our service and get them to sign-up? (Marketing)

  • How do I get more users to return to our service? (Product)

  • How do I get returning users to become customers? (Sales)

Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC), Churn, and LIfetime Value (LTV) are the KPIs used to check the health of a SaaS business. We track the funnel, calculate conversion rates, and search for repeatable patterns to make our revenue numbers. To be a successful company, the value proposition should be easy to understand, the product should be easy to use, and it should be easy to buy. If any of those three things falls short, the company fails. In my opinion, it can all be summed into Customer Experience. A blurb from Wikipedia [1]:

Hand writing Smiley on the Customer  - Customer Retention Customer experience (CX) is the product of an interaction between an organization and a customer over the duration of their relationship. This interaction includes a customer’s attraction, awareness, discovery, cultivation, advocacy and purchase and use of a service.

In this article, we will briefly explore one part of these interactions, specifically between the user and product itself. An effectively designed product will solve one or many user problems. A key element in successful user adoption is User Onboarding. While it sounds simple, it is the most critical and often the most ignored part of the product development cycle. We will explore this subject in the context of Enterprise SaaS where a solution is expected to solve multiple pains and generally has a lot of moving parts and complex workflows. We will discuss why onboarding should be a priority and how to do it correctly.

Why User Onboarding

Everything is about people.

People use things, people pay for things.
People require services, people provide services.
People use products, people develop products.

In all of the grand things in life, people are the only constant ingredient. So, it’s imperative that the experiences people have are delightful and memorable. All the functions in an organization should focus on this metric.

Above statements are a true reflection of my way of thinking about businesses as is evident from my LinkedIn summary.

1480302922795[1]Providing a great experience on all user touchpoints should be part of the core of all functions in a company. Specifically, user onboarding for the products should not be a project or a feature that gets released but then is not looked at for months or years; rather, it should be an element that is always evolving.

The essence of user onboarding is how quickly a product can provide value to the user by helping them solve their problem and getting them to the “wow” moment. For users of Enterprise SaaS products, it is critical that they feel in control of achieving their goals. There are several reasons why User Onboarding is so important:

  1. Quick Adoption and Frequent Releases: Traditionally, users are accustomed to locally-installed enterprise software, also known as shipped software. This software is not updated frequently and thereby a user gets a lot of time to become comfortable with it. Ultimately, such software gets very sticky and the companies reap rewards for a long time. So, these users bring a lot of baggage with them when they are trying to adopt new SaaS products. Therefore, it is important that the initial transition to the new SaaS paradigm is smooth and quick. The Unique Selling Point (USP) of SaaS products is mobility for users and an abstraction of several moving components. Successfully delivering such an abstraction requires replacing existing workflows while eliminating barriers. Also, this delivery model provides an opportunity for companies to introduce improvements and features more frequently. Extra care should be taken in such shorter release cycles to avoid disruption to users’ current workflows.

  1. Competition: Since SaaS products are now becoming mainstream, users have a lot of options and the cost of switching to a new product is relatively low. For the companies, the cost of customer acquisition is increasing since there is more competition. So, products can’t really win purely on functionality; achieving desired stickiness with their users will require a lot more. The usability of a product and onboarding experience is quickly becoming the differentiating factor. Consumer products were the first ones to take advantage of these notions and with a strong user-base overlap between consumer products and SaaS products, it was only a matter of time when users felt that business software needs to match the experience of non-business software, also known as “Consumerization of IT”.

  1. Lifetime Value: The goal of a great user onboarding for a SaaS product is to allow a user to extract maximum value in shortest time possible so that they become repeat users and potentially paid customers. Often, a user would be willing to pay for a premium service if it offers great onboarding experience and either eliminates a steep learning curve or manages it well. Bad user onboarding is a sure way to alienate potential customers. A user will try a product, and if they can’t reach to the value quickly, they will leave and never come back. In an Enterprise SaaS company, the sales cycles are short and the payback period is long. And, there’s always a risk of churn. So, the company should invest in right onboarding to reduce their churn and thereby increase their customer lifetime value.

Now that we understand why user onboarding is so critical to SaaS world, let’s see how it can be done right and few mistakes to be avoided.

How To Do Enterprise SaaS User Onboarding

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAw9AAAAJDdmZmFjZjNmLTJkNDItNDliMi05ZDI2LWViYWEwNGQxMTk3NA[1]One quick search about “SaaS Onboarding” will show thousands of results for books and articles advocating various methods to improve the experience for a new user. All these methods and ideologies have one thing in common – “reduce and control friction in the product”. Even with all the advice, the products that we develop and use on a daily basis have great visual appeal but less thought out user journey. In the last ten years, the advancement in application frameworks has had a significant impact on the visual layer of Enterprise SaaS products. The development is so quick that there’s a new framework every six months or so.

On the other hand, there has been less emphasis on measuring user perception and behavior and improving the onboarding based on those insights:

  1. Why did this user not use the product after signing-up?

  2. How much time does it take for the users to reach the first milestone?

  3. What percentage of the expected first-interaction behavior is the user completing?

  4. Are there any dead ends in the workflow that prevent the users to get early wins?

All these are important questions for a product manager to be able to improve the product adoption with first-time users.

Here’s a short framework to kickstart the improvement of user onboarding (and entire product in general) for Enterprise SaaS:

  1. Start from the end goal and work backward: Understand the user and their specific problems, and then design the product and market the value proposition. This way of thinking is getting standardized via the disciplines of user experience design and lays the groundwork for designing user onboarding. Result: With the user research done properly, the user onboarding will cater to the acute problems that a user faces while solving their pains and this will lead to a simple and focused product.

  1. Convey the value proposition clearly: People’s attention span is getting shorter; providing a clear value proposition goes a long way to create excitement and motivate a user to try the product. Correct messaging is a critical first step of onboarding. Find the content that led current users to the “aha” moment. Work with the sales team to learn what potential customers perceive as the value proposition. Then work with the marketing team to make sure those nuggets are presented well to the visitors in all web and print material. Show the users the promised land. Result: Users will be motivated before trying the product.

  1. framework[1]Get them in the door: Once a user understands your value proposition, it’s important to keep that momentum going by getting them into the product as soon as possible. Design the sign-up process to be quick and let the user get an early win. For example, if the sign-up process requires collecting a lot of information, it’s better to collect the most critical items first and the remaining information as the user progresses in the product. Tie the collection of these nuggets with various product actions. Result: Users will not be overwhelmed and would give you more information as they use the product.

  1. Find conversion actions: Track all the user activity in your product to identify the actions that led a user to become a customer. Or, just watch the users use your product and see what they do to reach the main goal. If available, work with the sales team to participate in potential customers’ product evaluation process. There is a heavy component of product analytics in this part of user onboarding improvement and always reveals very interesting insights! For example, if one of the conversion milestones for a data analytics product is to enable an integration, find out how much time a user takes  to get to that step and the number of steps that lead to it. In other words, work with the product analytics team to understand the user journey. Result: This will help reduce CAC.

  1. Balance Friction: Using the insights above, improve the flow to let the users reach the conversion actions more quickly. Eliminate all the extraneous steps that are not strongly tied to the value of the product. Make the flow intuitive so that a user  This will reduce the time from first interaction to conversion actions. Provide relevant feedback to the user during their onboarding to establish the notions of security, reliability and fun, wherever applicable. It’s best for the users as they extract more value and feel more confident, and it’s great for the company as the product gets sticky with user’s each new win. Result: This will drive down the churn rate.

In summary:

  1. Create meaningful experiences that let users get to the value immediately and continually

  2. Include user onboarding in the foundation layer of product development and let the entire organization strive for improving the user experience.

  3. Anything we can do to make it easier for a customer to get started with the product, the better.

Great user onboarding facilitates problem solving and gets out of the way of a user!

More About The Product Mentor
TPM-Short3-Logo4The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Management Mentors and Mentees around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A
  • Mentors and Mentees sharing their product management knowledge with the broader community

Sign up to be a Mentor today & join an elite group of product management leaders!

Check out the Mentors & Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

Product- vs. Service-centric Companies

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In a recent live stream from one of our mentors of The Product Mentor, Sarah Varki, lead a conversation around “Product Management: Product- vs. Service-centric Companies”.  We are always looking for more product mentors from all around the world.  Signup to be a Mentor Today!

View the live stream…

 

About The Product Mentor

The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Mentors and Mentees from around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A

Signup to be a Mentor Today!

Throughout the program, each mentor leads a conversation in an area of their expertise that is live streamed and available to both mentee and the broader product community.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

Managing Your Career and Yourself Like a Product

Guest Post by: Hansa Vagadiya (Mentee, Session 4, The Product Mentor) [Paired with Mentor, Ladislav Bartos]

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Recently, I participated in a product management mentorship program run by The Product Mentor.

Ladislav Bartos, who was assigned to me as my inspirational mentor, has been working with me to further hone in on my product management skills. I have improved my stakeholder management techniques; learnt about service design thinking and enhanced my Google Analytics knowledge. But the most important thing the product mentorship can unconsciously provide, is guidance and support towards clarifying what your long term career goals are as a product manager.

Think of your product management career development as a new product that is going to be released into the market. You want to be the product that is useable, feasible and valuable to the target audience/customer ie you’re selling yourself as the solution to some specific company’s specific problem.

In product management you’re schooled to, identify who your customers are; identify a value proposition strategy and to persuade stakeholders of the vision you want to achieve. You can stand out from other product managers by applying these skills to yourself.

MVP of you

In product development, the minimum viable product (MVP) is a product which has just enough features to gather validated learning about the product and its continued development. If you are just starting out in your product management career it is important to look at where you fit in the market.

This is where you will need to do carry out market research and value proposition testing.

  1. Who is the target audience/segment/customer? (Which company should value the attributes you have to offer?)

  2. What problem are you solving? (What are the company’s problem you can help alleviate?)

  3. What product features can solve the problem? (What special skills and experience do you have?)

Release 2

Image result for product releaseNow that the MVP has been launched to the user – it is time to iterate and make improvements on the product based on customer feedback and lessons learned.

  1. How can you improve on a current feature? (What skills do you have that can be enhanced?)

  2. How can you further establish a competitive advantage in the market? (Do you want to have a competitive edge in having experience towards a particular business function? UX, Business or Technology focussed product manager?)

Tapping into a network of people that have experience in product management and/or reading product management books/online resources will help you to answer these questions.

Release 3 (Pivot)

As a product, you have been available in the market for some time and have either succeeded in solving your target audience’s short term problem and/or are struggling to add any further value and you have decided to pivot. A pivot is a “structured course correction designed to test a new fundamental hypothesis about the product, strategy, and engine of growth.”[1

  • Is there another target audience that is better satisfied with the product you have? (What other company could benefit from your skills and experiences?)

  • Does the value proposition need tweaking or changing completely? (Are there other industry/product types that interest you? Ecommerce? Publishing? etc)

  • Are your product features not solving the user’s problem? (Are your skills and experiences no longer suited towards the role you are currently in?)

When deciding to pivot it is good to think about these questions beforehand to evaluate the costs and benefits of pivoting.

Do you have a Product Roadmap? 

As a product manager the management of your product roadmap is the same as the management of yourself and your career.

What is your product vision? What are your goals? What are the metrics that will determine if your goals have been achieved? (Where do you want to be in the next 5 – 10 years? What industry excited you and has potential growth? What skills do you want to develop by x period of time and what are the success metrics?)

Without having a product roadmap, it is difficult to know what stage you are in your product lifecycle. It’s a question a lot of budding product managers face. Do you keep iterating on your product after the initial MVP launch or is it time to pivot?

As I come to the end of the mentorship program I would like to advise all other budding product managers to create your own product roadmaps. You’ll be surprised at how much it can help you answer your own questions.

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More About The Product Mentor
TPM-Short3-Logo4The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Management Mentors and Mentees around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A
  • Mentors and Mentees sharing their product management knowledge with the broader community

Sign up to be a Mentor today & join an elite group of product management leaders!

Check out the Mentors & Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

Product Management & The Challenge of Globalization

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In a recent live stream from one of our mentors of The Product Mentor, Ladislav Bartos, lead a conversation around “The Challenge of Globalization”.  We are always looking for more product mentors from all around the world.  Signup to be a Mentor Today!

View the live stream…

 

About The Product Mentor

The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Mentors and Mentees from around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A

Signup to be a Mentor Today!

Throughout the program, each mentor leads a conversation in an area of their expertise that is live streamed and available to both mentee and the broader product community.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

How Communicating More Can Help You Succeed as a Product Manager

Guest Post by: Lonnie Rosenbaum (Mentee, Session 4, The Product Mentor) [Paired with Mentor, Marc Abraham]

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Sharing product information within your company is one of the most valuable things you can do as a product manager. Whether it’s your plans (roadmap), feedback you’ve heard from users, product usage data (analytics), or posing questions — getting what you’re doing and thinking in front of a cross-departmental audience will provide you with input that helps you make better decisions and will help align others with the goals you’re looking to achieve.

Spreading info can also help other people be more effective in their roles as they’ll be able to better prepare for upcoming changes. It can get them excited about the direction of the product, and it can make it known across your organization that you’re a person to bring questions or feedback to — opening up more lines of communication to help inform your thinking.

Tactics

funwheelswingin[1]Hold a recurring meeting once per month that gets you in front of a cross-departmental audience

  • Invite people not only from Product & Tech, but also Support, Sales, Training, and any other relevant group.

  • Create slides to walk the audience through:

    • What’s been happening with the product (e.g., recap the last release, usage data)

    • What’s coming up soon (e.g., the next release)

    • Future thinking (e.g., distant roadmap possibilities)

    • Research initiatives (e.g., what problems about your users or business you’ve identified recently and their impact, what solutions might be viable, what you plan to learn about soon)

    • Competitive analysis (e.g., if you recently discovered a new competitor that you think would be valuable for others to know about, or if you want to highlight how a potential new feature could be a differentiator for your company’s solution vs. others)

  • Solicit feedback.

  • At the end, recap any next steps and actions.

While this might take you a few hours to prepare for each month, sharing information (ideally in an engaging way) is one of the most valuable things that can be done within a company, not only bringing info to others but also to you.

These sessions can also give people better insight into how you think and approach things as a product person, which is particularly valuable to stakeholders who you don’t work with on a regular basis. And it’s a way to take people on the journey of the product, showing where it’s been and where it’s heading, growing support and buy-in along the way.

stand out from the crowd

Sync with certain people in advance of this meeting to prepare material

  • Ask co-workers in Support about common user pitfalls and analyze Support case trends with them.

  • Ask co-workers in Sales and/or Business Development about common sticking points that prevent a deal from closing. (Or if your company is more Marketing-centric, sync with the Marketing team.)

  • Ask the appropriate people about why users stop using your product (i.e., cancellations / churn).

You’d ideally be able to see quantitative data on these topics, in addition to having conversations about them. Depending on how much detail is made available to you, it could also be useful to speak with some of the users who these topics relate to so that you can dig deeper into the reasons behind what they said to your co-workers (i.e., learning why something happened, instead of only what happened).

Example

The following is an example sequence of slides that you could use or adapt

  1. Intro / purpose of the meeting (state a goal of sharing information and identifying better solutions)

  2. Recap of last release

  3. Plan for next release

  4. Insight / question #1 (takeaways from recent research you did, a trend that you think is worth raising awareness for and getting feedback on, or some other topic you’d like to increase visibility on)

  5. Insight / question #2

  6. Questions / feedback (while you should welcome questions or feedback throughout the meeting, it’s a good idea to dedicate a couple of minutes at the end for anything not already covered)

Tips

Don’t feel like you need to do all of the above from the start

  • You can start simple with a small audience and short list of topics to get feedback and adapt for the next session, gradually inviting more people.

  • The most important thing is to get started with something, and be open with participants about how you want them to get value out of it and that you welcome their feedback. Adjust the format over time to find what works best.

  • Aim for a 50-minute meeting. If you find that 50 minutes isn’t enough, trim some content for the next time so that you can get it done in 50 minutes. If you engage the participants (e.g., by asking some to help prepare material in advance, and by inviting questions/feedback during), this will feel like a short meeting packed with insights and takeaways for everyone.

0155351_PE313641_S5[1]Frame the meeting in the right way

  • It’s not meant to be a collaborative prioritization session. Some open discussion among attendees is great, but it’s not a debate on what to work on.

  • You’re sharing information and believe that everyone benefits from hearing insights, both from you and others.

In general, respond quickly to whatever comes your way

  • Even if you don’t have an answer that someone is hoping for (e.g., if your answer is that it’s going to be a while longer until their concern is addressed in the product), getting back to people in a timely manner gives them reason to reach out to you again in the future, which can provide you with valuable intel.

  • Sometimes you might pass someone’s question to someone else who is better suited to answer it, which is fine. Whether you or someone else answers it, you helped get the answer.

Recap

Communication is a two-way street. When you share information with others, they’re more likely to share information with you.

Having a steady flow of communication with a group of people from across your organization enables you to test ideas sooner, hear feedback sooner, and make ideas better — resulting in better product decisions and benefits for both users and the business.

Overall, communication can be a big factor in a product manager’s success, both with a product’s success and also the product manager’s career trajectory. Seize the opportunity to spread information and to learn from others, and position yourself as a go-to person in your company.

[Note: This article didn’t touch on external communication, such as with users, partners, or vendors, which is worthy of its own writeup.]

About Lonnie Rosenbaum
LonnieRosenbaumPicture-Choice2Lonnie is a product manager with experience in both web and mobile, currently working at Booker on their native mobile apps. Previously, he held product roles at three other technology companies, two of which he co-founded. Lonnie blogs about product and entrepreneurship at http://lonnierosenbaum.com.

 

 

 

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Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
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  • Mentors and Mentees sharing their product management knowledge with the broader community

Sign up to be a Mentor today & join an elite group of product management leaders!

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Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

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About The Product Mentor

The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Mentors and Mentees from around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

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  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A

Signup to be a Mentor Today!

Throughout the program, each mentor leads a conversation in an area of their expertise that is live streamed and available to both mentee and the broader product community.

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View the live stream…

 

About The Product Mentor

The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Mentors and Mentees from around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A

Signup to be a Mentor Today!

Throughout the program, each mentor leads a conversation in an area of their expertise that is live streamed and available to both mentee and the broader product community.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
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