How to Quickly Prioritize Your Product Backlog

Guest Post by: Christopher Davis (Mentee, Session 4, The Product Mentor) [Paired with Mentor, Jonathan Berg]

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As a product manager, you’ll often find yourself with a growing backlog of user stories and product defects that need grooming and scheduling. But which ones should come first, and why? A  robust ranking framework is key to answering these questions.

Sometime after beginning my work as a product manager at Bandsintown, I was introduced by my product mentor, Jonathan Berg, to a framework that allows me to confidently justify my decision-making to key company stakeholders and to align my goals and priorities to those of the broader business. Because every team’s needs may be a little different, the framework can be adapted to many situations.

With this framework, you will be able to promote more effective communication with your development team, reduce re-work, and prioritize which defects to work on, ultimately allowing your team to achieve a much faster time-to-market. Following successful implementation of this framework, you should feel that you’ve improved your operational product management skills, focused your day-to-day activities, and increased your team’s productivity.

USER STORY PRIORITIZATION

To prioritize our user stories, my team implemented a simple story ranking system adapted from Michael Lant, founder of projectyap.com. In theory, we assign both urgency and business value a separate number from one to five, then we multiply the two numbers to determine a story’s final weight. This weight is mapped on a two-vector matrix to help us visualize and prioritize the story in our upcoming roadmap.

In practice, I plug each user story’s rankings into a scorecard inside Aha!, a wonderful product roadmapping software tool my team uses in conjunction with JIRA. Before joining The Product Mentor program, I had already toyed with Aha!’s default scorecard system in an attempt to implement fibonacci sequence story sizing with my engineering team. Ultimately, I found it daunting, causing me to ignore the feature and us to return to time-based story sizing instead of point-based sizing.

Below is an example of Aha!’s default scorecard:

After my mentor introduced Lant’s system to me, I revisited Aha!’s scorecards and decided to create a custom scorecard for user story management. This is what it looked like at first:

The values for urgency relate to immediate impact, dependency of other stories, and timeliness of delivery. For example, a story with an urgency ranking of 1 might have no time constraint and very little impact, while a story with an urgency ranking of 5 might be extremely time constrained, have many dependencies, and must be completed immediately to have any meaningful impact.

The table below provides Lant’s example wording for ranking a story’s urgency:

5

Extremely time constrained.

Extreme level of dependency of other items on the completion of this task

If not completed immediately there is little or no value to doing it

4

Highly time constrained

High level of dependency of other items on the completion of this task

Important to go into the next sprint because of customer or contractual requirements

3

Moderately time constrained

Moderate dependency of other items on the completion of this task

Desirable to complete in the next one or two sprints

2

Minimally time constrained

Minimal dependency of other items on the completion of this task

Completion in the next two or three sprints is adequate

1

Not time constrained

No dependencies

Little or no impact

The numbers for business value relate to the level of competitive advantage, impact on brand/reputation and the number of customers the story is important to. A story with a business value of 1 might be important to very few customers with little impact, while a 5 might be important to every single customer and/or critical to the survival of the business.

The table below provides Lant’s example wording for ranking a story’s business value:

5

Extremely important to most or all customers

Extreme impact on brand or reputation

Critical to the success of the business

4

Important to many customers

Significant impact on brand or reputation

Significant competitive advantage

3

Important to a moderate number of customers

Moderate significant impact on brand or reputation

Moderate important competitive advantage

2

Important to only few customers

Minor impact on brand or reputation

Minor competitive advantage

1

Important to only a few or even no customers

Little or no impact on brand or reputation

Little or no competitive advantage

Now, how do you make the work actionable once you’ve assigned each story its numbers? That’s where priority comes in. Below you’ll see Lant’s original story priority matrix:

After mapping your story across the priority matrix, you need a color-coded key to help you decide when to take action. Below is Lant’s original story priority key:

After creating my original Aha scorecard, I began using this color-coded matrix and actionable color key with my own team. Due to resource constraints, I quickly realized that my boss and organization in general is a bit more comfortable with addressing 6’s, 8’s and 9’s at a later point on the roadmap than Lant suggests, so we adjusted the story priority matrix to look like this:

DEFECT PRIORITIZATION

After my team had a system in place for prioritizing user stories, we began struggling to work in defects. “Can’t we use the same framework?” I wondered, and as it turns out, we could!

Leveraging another article from Michael Lant, we created a matrix to work from that was similar to our story matrix, but with different criteria that made a little more sense when addressing a defect (also known as a bug, or whatever you want to call it).

To prioritize our defects, we changed what’s on the X and Y axis of the two-vector matrix. Instead of urgency, we use scope, and instead of business value, we use severity. For each, we still assign a number from one to five, then we multiply the two numbers to determine a story’s final weight.

I went to add a second scorecard in Aha! after settling on these criteria and I realized that the software only allows you to assign a single scorecard per product. This was a problem. My solution was to combine both defect and story prioritization into one scorecard.

View an example of the combined scorecard below:

For defects, the values for scope relate to the amount of users affected and the amount of system functionality affected. For example, a defect with an scope ranking of 1 might affect a very small set of users and/or a tiny piece of system functionality, while a defect with a scope ranking of 5 might be affecting all users of the product and/or most system functionality.

The table below provides Lant’s example wording for ranking a defect’s scope:

5

Affects most or all users and/or a very large range of system functionality

4

Affects a large set of users and/or large range of system functionality

3

Affects a moderate set of users and/or moderate range of system functionality

2

Affects a small set of users and/or a small range of system functionality

1

Affects a minimal set of users and/or a very small range of system functionality

The values for severity relate to how easy it is to get around the defect. For example, a defect with a severity ranking of 1 might only be a typo or some small cosmetic issue, while a story with a severity ranking of 5 might be corrupted or lost data, or a system that is entirely unavailable.

The table below provides Lant’s example wording for ranking a defect’s severity:

5

Data loss, data corruption or system unavailable

4

Important functionality is unavailable with no workaround

3

Important functionality is unavailable but has a reasonable workaround

2

Secondary functionality is unavailable but has a reasonable workaround

1

Cosmetic issues or some functionality unavailable but has a simple workaround

Once again, we need a color-coded matrix and associated key to help us address each priority color. Below you will find Lant’s original color matrix:

Similar to our story matrix, we adjusted the defect priority matrix colors to look like this:

And here is Lant’s decision-making key for defects:

As a result of these new ranking frameworks, my team was able to work our way through a long, seemingly never-ending list of defects that were rarely being addressed. I’m now feeling better about the quality of my product from both a defect management and a new feature prioritization perspective. Our process is much more streamlined, and I am able to quickly throw ideas and defects into unranked buckets before I properly rank and prioritize them. This way, I never lose an idea if I am too busy working on something else.

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And that’s it! I’m still iterating on this process myself, so I would love to hear if you are able to apply a similar process to your own team using new methods or tools other than the ones mentioned here.

Good luck!

About Christopher Davis
ChrisDavis-headshot_8-3-2013_500x500Chris is a Product Manager at Bandsintown, Product Expert in Residence at General Assembly, and a writer and editor for music magazines including DJ Times, ClubWorld and The Music & Sound Retailer. Additionally, Chris is a life-long percussionist, DJ, and a music producer that has performed in wind symphonies, the Atlanta Falcons drumline, and various bands. He is also a graduate of The University of Georgia and is a huge college football fan. Find him on Twitter and across the internet at @chriskdavis.

More About The Product Mentor
TPM-Short3-Logo4The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Management Mentors and Mentees around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A
  • Mentors and Mentees sharing their product management knowledge with the broader community

Sign up to be a Mentor today & join an elite group of product management leaders!

Check out the Mentors & Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

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Stopping Creep, Attracting Influencers and a WayBetter November

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Nominate a great product manager you know today @ http://TheBestProductPerson.com !
Remember to subscribe to our YouTube channel @
http://tpg.li/subscribe-tpg

Thank you to everyone who made it to our latest roundtable meet-up of The Product Group at iHeartMedia, as well as to our other sponsors, Yext, BKLYN and many more.

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Over the course of the night a few of the highlights were…

Featured Product: In/Spree Brands
exploring the product, its challenges and successes, from attracting the right influencers to more brands

Avoiding Feature Creep
from “positive” creep to strengthening process … and much more


The Product Group
meet-ups are an opportunity for Product People (managers, strategists, marketers, etc.) to come together to meet, interact, and network in a roundtable setting. It’s awesome to meet fellow Product People in a laid-back, conversational gathering.

If you are a Product Person and are interested in having your product featured or participating as a featured guest expert at an upcoming meetup of The Product Group, contact me (or email at jhorn (a-t.) tpgblog DoT com).

I am looking forward to seeing everyone at our next meetup

Thursday, November 2nd @ 7PM
RSVP Now!  

Stay tuned for more announcements about November’s Featured Product, WayBetter.

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Please submit your nominations for 2017’s great product management candidates @ http://TheBestProductPerson.com !

Learn more @ http://tpglog.com/tbpp

tpj-logo-w_lkwAnd, don’t forget to check out our new job board exclusively dedicated to Product jobs!Visit  http://TheProductJobs.com and happy hunting!
TPM-Short3-Logo4If you are interested in being a Product Mentor or seeking Product Management Mentorship…

Visit http://TheProductMentor.com and
Sign-up today!

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

P.S. Interested in becoming a sponsor or host of The Product Group? contact me.

Product Manager Advice: Working with Designers

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In a recent live stream from one of our mentors of The Product Mentor, Jonathan Berg, lead a conversation around “Working with Designers”.  We are always looking for more product mentors from all around the world.  Signup to be a Mentor Today!

View the live stream…

 

About The Product Mentor

The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Mentors and Mentees from around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A

Signup to be a Mentor Today!

Throughout the program, each mentor leads a conversation in an area of their expertise that is live streamed and available to both mentee and the broader product community.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

In Product Management, soft skills lead to hard lessons

Guest Post by: Jince Kuruvilla (Mentee, Session 4, The Product Mentor) [Paired with Mentor, Rishi Kumar]

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Regret, sorrow, disappointment – not all team check-ins and spec reviews end like this, but for a while, most of mine did. I mean, I was nearly a year into my first real Product Management position and I still didn’t feel like I knew what I was doing! Sure, I had spent the majority of my career as a UX Designer, and when I transitioned into a Product Manager role, I made sure to work tirelessly and develop “hard” PM skills like market analyzation, feature prioritization, a command of AGILE, etc. I knew how to build successful products and how to communicate & collaborate effectively, so why was I having such a hard time being a Product Manager?

Well, it took me a while (and a lot of long conversations with my mentor, Rishi Kumar) to realize that my brute force technique wasn’t working. In my quest to learn so many hard PM skills, I seemed to have missed the importance of learning the softer side of being a PM – building and maintaining close relationships with your team.

calculatedistance[1]It wasn’t like we actively distrusted each other – more so the fact that we rarely saw each other in person – we had a wee 4,225 mile gap between myself in Brooklyn, NY and my engineers in Poland. Don’t get me wrong, we communicated pretty frequently –  emails, Skype chats, and a few weekly video chats. Technically, we were in sync and producing great work but the problem was that the great work never aligned: I’d make great specs and document great features, but my engineers felt uncomfortable asking questions and being overly critical of the specs while I felt embarrassed to ask about technical issues, resulting in features being built that were far from the specifications.

My mentor, Rishi, took time to hear me out and help dissect my issue. If anyone could help, it was him; he also worked with a remote team in a different time zone—he could empathize and understand my situation. Rishi even went on to give a fantastic presentation about working remotely to the Product Group! In his talk, he discusses concepts like communication equality, the importance of making personal connections, and most importantly, building trust through transparency/visibility. Rishi helped me realize that in order to address these issues I was having, I needed to take a different approach to my work relationships. With his guidance (and the nuggets of wisdom that the other mentors in the program shared on the youtube presentations), I set out with a new approach to building greater trust and camaraderie within my team:

  1. I established a strict daily “standup” meeting.

    My Polish teammates and I  communicated through email and skype messages constantly, so initially, there never felt like a real need for a standup. A few weeks after starting a daily standup, however, I could see why they’re such a crucial element in Product teams – the daily standup allowed me to have face-time with my coworkers and have a chance to interact informally with each other. The daily standups, though redundant at times, helped us grow closer by formally creating space for conversations to occur and for viewpoints to be explained.

  1. I set out to share my raw, unfinished work with my teammates.

    I will admit that I have a tendency to be a perfectionist. I’m no stranger to sharing my works in progress with my fellow PM’s but sharing with developers and engineers meant being able to explain every little technical detail – I couldn’t “paint in broad strokes,” is what I had initially thought.

    Work_In_Progress[1]I experimented by having a few collaborative work-sessions with my developers over Skype – I showed them sketches and very rough concepts and ideas to help them understand my point-of-view but also to give them a chance to make suggestions and iterate together. At first, the conversations were laborious and slid very far onto the technical side of things, but we soon found our footing and were able to have both high-level “broad strokes” conversations alongside the technical/implementation questions.

    Through this process, I ended up becoming quite comfortable with the phrase “I don’t know. I’ll look into that.” I was initially afraid that showing this vulnerability would tarnish what respect they had for me, but soon found that they respected me even more for sharing my process and unfinished ideas. Not only did it give us a chance to brainstorm and ideate together, it allowed my team to see a side of our process that they hadn’t seen before.

    Soon after, my teammates would set up meetings with me to show me their own unfinished work: rough builds of features they were working on. Product demos were starting to happen nearly daily (instead of once or twice a week, previously) which led to greater transparency and greater shared ownership in our product development process..

  1. I set out to talk about anything but work .
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    As pedestrian as it may sound, this was probably the biggest takeaway for me. It’s easy for me to socialize with my co-workers in my Brooklyn office since we spend so much (physical) time with each other – but my teammates in Poland don’t really get to see that “social-Jince” since most of our communication was work-related.

    To counter this, I set out with a peculiar strategy – I set up calendar invites as reminders to myself to have non-work-related conversations with my Polish counterparts – conversations to check up on their families, their hobbies, etc. As embarrassing as it sounds, the calendar invites helped tremendously in making sure I had these conversations.

    I learned so much about my coworkers and what made each of them tick. It all eventually helped me understand how best to communicate with them at work. I knew that Piotr, with his design interest, could understand when i talked about functionality in broad, visual strokes, while Michal was less interested in the visual side and wanted to know what the user goals were and the rationale for every single UI element and product decision. These learnings led to more efficient work-related communication between all of us. 

I was skeptical at first, but focusing on building these soft skills of navigating and forming camaraderie with my remote co-workers has been, without a shadow of a doubt, one of the greatest lessons I’ve ever learned in my Product Management career. The results speak for themselves: after about a month of implementing these new tactics, team morale increased tremendously and we hit our stride. Spec meetings and daily standups were no long foreboding events, but events that our team looked forward to.

I’m happy to share that our team’s friendship has evolved to become the foundation of our working relationship – our interpersonal connections have helped us successfully navigate tense product conversations and establish a wealth of empathy for each other’s’ roles and responsibilities.

The soft skills that the The Product Mentor program drove me to learn have lead to hard lessons; most of which come back to a simple idea: in order to build great products, you need to have a great team — in order to have a great team, you have to work on building trust, camaraderie and a sense of belonging. Only then will you and your team be able to produce the best possible work possible. Take it from me—I learned these soft skills the hard way!

 

About Jince Kuruvilla
JinceKuruvillaJince is a Product Manager with a background in User Experience and Design Strategy. He’s carved a career for himself working on products that inspire and empower people – everything from physical products to digital experiences. Ask him about spices, social entrepreneurship, and hip hop trivia — you’re sure to get an earful!

More About The Product Mentor
TPM-Short3-Logo4The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Management Mentors and Mentees around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A
  • Mentors and Mentees sharing their product management knowledge with the broader community

Sign up to be a Mentor today & join an elite group of product management leaders!

Check out the Mentors & Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

Working Remotely in Product Management

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In a recent live stream from one of our mentors of The Product Mentor, Rishi Kumar, lead a conversation around “Working Remotely”.  We are always looking for more product mentors from all around the world.  Signup to be a Mentor Today!

View the live stream…

 

About The Product Mentor

The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Mentors and Mentees from around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A

Signup to be a Mentor Today!

Throughout the program, each mentor leads a conversation in an area of their expertise that is live streamed and available to both mentee and the broader product community.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

ShopKeep, Lifetime Value & the Happy Product Manager

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Nominate a great product manager you know today @ http://TheBestProductPerson.com !
Remember to subscribe to our YouTube channel @
http://tpg.li/subscribe-tpg

Thank you to everyone who made it to our latest roundtable meet-up of The Product Group at iHeartMedia, with food and drinks sponsored by People10, as well as to our other sponsors, Yext, BKLYN and many more.

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Over the course of the night a few of the highlights were…

Featured Product: ShopKeep
exploring the product, its challenges and successes, from lifetime value to deprecating features

Being a Happy Product Manager
from arguments to solving problems


The Product Group
meet-ups are an opportunity for Product People (managers, strategists, marketers, etc.) to come together to meet, interact, and network in a roundtable setting. It’s awesome to meet fellow Product People in a laid-back, conversational gathering.

If you are a Product Person and are interested in having your product featured or participating as a featured guest expert at an upcoming meetup of The Product Group, contact me (or email at jhorn (a-t.) tpgblog DoT com).

I am looking forward to seeing everyone at our next meetup

Thursday, October 5th @ 7PM
RSVP Now!  

Stay tuned for more announcements about October’s Featured Product, In/Spree Brands.

TBPP2016_alt-abrv-114_thumb2_thumb_t[2]

Please submit your nominations for 2017’s great product management candidates @ http://TheBestProductPerson.com !

Learn more @ http://tpglog.com/tbpp

tpj-logo-w_lkwAnd, don’t forget to check out our new job board exclusively dedicated to Product jobs!Visit  http://TheProductJobs.com and happy hunting!
TPM-Short3-Logo4If you are interested in being a Product Mentor or seeking Product Management Mentorship…

Visit http://TheProductMentor.com and
Sign-up today!

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

P.S. Interested in becoming a sponsor or host of The Product Group? contact me.

Measuring from Product to Development

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In a recent live stream from one of our mentors of The Product Mentor, Bennett Morrison, lead a conversation around “Measuring Product and Development”.  We are always looking for more product mentors from all around the world.  Signup to be a Mentor Today!

View the live stream…

 

About The Product Mentor

The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Mentors and Mentees from around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A

Signup to be a Mentor Today!

Throughout the program, each mentor leads a conversation in an area of their expertise that is live streamed and available to both mentee and the broader product community.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

The Worst Nightmare of Any Product Manager

Guest Post by: Liel Aharon (Mentee, Session 4, The Product Mentor) [Paired with Mentor, Felix Sargent]

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At the end of 2015 I was in the worst nightmare of any Product Manager.

I had a strong roadmap, clear goals and a vision for the product. The team had been working for almost a year and had a huge amount of code under their belts. We would regularly meet to discuss the features required, what the customers expected. We were making great progress. But just because it was a lot of code doesn’t mean it worked. In fact, our tests regularly failed. The relationship between QA and Engineering was bordering on food fights, and we’d only achieved half of our requirements. A production release was a distant vision.

As we were getting closer to the end of the year, my senior vice president called me in, to review our progress against our goals. He asked me to provide a status of where we stand, and wanted to make sure we are on track to deliver on time and get our bonus.

Oh crap, no way we could deliver on time I thought to myself.
How did I get here?

It wasn’t one thing. There were a variety of different problems, and symptoms. We’d made great code. We had good production standards. We were Agile, with daily standups, two week sprints and detailed estimations. We were testing our code. What did we lack?

Focus.

I thought if we’re already doing one thing we might as well also another, or just fix this thing as well. When we were working on creating the edit permissions group for apps, we also decided to work on the internal permissions that will be used by the team that supports the Appstore. Similar, right? Should be an easy fix. Wrong.

I’m not a technical Product Manager. I knew that I couldn’t look into the code to see that our engineers had built what I was looking for. I felt I had to wait until a feature built out before I could give my feedback.

We were doing Agile. We had a daily standup, sprints and estimations. But with nothing to ship, were we? Did it matter? Was it my fault?

My Senior Vice President needed an answer. More “Context and Direction”. We needed to deliver in three months. What could we salvage?

“From now on, only our most critical stories will be completed as part of V 1.0.0.”

If we were going to ship in three months, we had to figure out what we were shipping. Two sleepless nights, eight shots of espresso and one bottle of wine later, I worked with the team to have a plan. We were going to focus on making the most crucial api call to create apps work, the rest we decided to change through direct db access at first.

Once we were able to define what  V1.0.0 was it was easier to break down the issues into small stories. Prioritizing between stories got easier, because we know what they were.  The result of it were clearly scoped versions, that last about 2 weeks for development, testing, and validation.

When the team started working in shorter cycles, testing was simpler, and they could get my feedback quicker. I had the confidence to test new features to make sure we are building in the right direction, and engineers felt on track.

Finally I was able to breath.

After going from a long development process to a shorter cycle, we have managed to resolve our most glaring problems. We managed to decrease each dev-test-release cycle from being months to 2 weeks. Was the problem Agile? Or were we just not doing it right? It’s easy to confuse the rituals of Agile with actually getting things done.

If you are having similar problems with your development process I highly advise you to analyze the reasons to them, starting with an honest answer to the question – is your process actually solving your problems?

 

About Liel Aharon
LielAharonLiel (pronounced as Lee-L’) is a Product Manager at MediaMath, the marketing operating system, and is the Product Owner of the company’s Appstore. Before that she held multiple positions in Fin-Tech companies in Israel as Associate Product Manager, Project Manager and QA Engineer. Her Computer Science with a major in Entrepreneurship along with her past experience is giving her a unique point of view with a let’s get this done attitude. When not working Liel can be found adoring her Boston Terrier puppy, or working on another home cooked meal with a paired cocktail.

More About The Product Mentor
TPM-Short3-Logo4The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Management Mentors and Mentees around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A
  • Mentors and Mentees sharing their product management knowledge with the broader community

Sign up to be a Mentor today & join an elite group of product management leaders!

Check out the Mentors & Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

How to Interview a Product Manager

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In a recent live stream from one of our mentors of The Product Mentor, Felix Sargent, lead a conversation around “How to Interview a Product Manager”.  We are always looking for more product mentors from all around the world.  Signup to be a Mentor Today!

View the live stream…

 

About The Product Mentor

The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Mentors and Mentees from around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A

Signup to be a Mentor Today!

Throughout the program, each mentor leads a conversation in an area of their expertise that is live streamed and available to both mentee and the broader product community.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

12 Rules for Building Your Product Management Playbook

Business strategy businessman holding a blackboard planning team strategy on a chalk drawing of a so

In a recent live stream from one of our mentors of The Product Mentor, Ian Moulton, lead a conversation around “Building Your Product Management Playbook”.  We are always looking for more product mentors from all around the world.  Signup to be a Mentor Today!

View the live stream…

 

About The Product Mentor

The Product Mentor is a program designed to pair Product Mentors and Mentees from around the World, across all industries, from start-up to enterprise, guided by the fundamental goals…

Better Decisions. Better Products. Better Product People.

Each Session of the program runs for 6 months with paired individuals…

  • Conducting regular 1-on-1 mentor-mentee chats
  • Sharing experiences with the larger Product community
  • Participating in live-streamed product management lessons and Q&A

Signup to be a Mentor Today!

Throughout the program, each mentor leads a conversation in an area of their expertise that is live streamed and available to both mentee and the broader product community.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy