jQuery Plugin: CuteTime, C’est Magnifique! (v 1.1) [UPDATE]

jquery-logo-256I am very pleased to announce the latest major update to the CuteTime jQuery plugin.

CuteTime provides the ability to easily…

  • convert timestamps to ‘cuter’ language-styled forms (e.g. yesterday, 2 hours ago, last year, in the future!),
  • customize the time scales and output formatting, and
  • update automatically and/or manually the displayed CuteTime(s).
Un-Cute Cute
2010-1-27 23:14:17 a few days ago
Thu, October 29, 2004 12:14:19 PM 5 years ago

Since CuteTime was released last year, there continues to be a flood of excellent feedback from many of you consisting of suggestions, bug reports (less of these), and feature requests (more of these). Much of that feedback has coalesced into this latest major release.

imageAs you may already have been able to tell, this latest update was, in part, inspired by the French language. Perhaps one of the greatest drivers, to whom I am grateful, of a central new feature within this release has been Bruno Morency, through whose guidance and linguistic support I was able to design a more robust, universal CuteTime for all languages and grammatical styles.

In addition to the inclusion of French CuteTime translations within the translations.txt file, this release, version 1.1, features…

  • ISO8601 date timestamp compliance
  • insertions using the %CT% pattern of computed numbers within the CuteTime cuteness
  • support for all foreign language characters and HTML
  • Spanish CuteTime translations, courtesy of Alex Hernandez
  • richer demos and test
  • improved settings flexibility of the CuteTime function
  • documentation updates (corrections and clarifications)

French, et al

Originally, CuteTime was developed with a less than universal syntactic centricity. Basically, CuteTime originally could handle the cuteness of presenting…

“a few seconds ago”
“last month”

…as well as prepend values resulting in…

” hours ago” becoming “4 hours ago”
” seconds ago” becoming “18 seconds ago”.

Now, in addition to supporting the prepending of the computed CuteTime,

  • the calculation can be inserted within the cuteness string, and
  • both formatted HTML styling and proper character accenting applied,

…resulting in the additional support for…

“il y a %CT% minutes” becoming “il y a 4 minutes”
“l\’année dernière” becoming “l’année dernière”
“<span style=’color: red; font-weight: bold’>in the future<span>” becomingin the future

ISO8601

image Formatting of timestamps is the bane of many a developer. Especially onerous is the handling of “standard” time formatting by the front-end developer. The JavaScript Date Object() supports the IETF standard, defined in RFC 822 Section 5, at least in FireFox, with most backend systems providing and storing (or at least converting to) dates in ISO8601 form.

Now, when converting a normal time into a CuteTime it can be either formatted in a manner compatible with the JavaScript Date() Object …

Thu Oct 15 2009 22:11:19 GMT-0400 (Eastern Daylight Time)
Oct 15 2009 22:11:19

… or ISO8601 …

2009-11-24T19:20:30+01:00
2009-11
2009-11-24T13:15:30Z

Implementation

CuteTime is a customizable jQuery plugin that automatically converts timestamps to formats much cuter. It also has the ability to manually and/or automatically update timestamps on a controlled interval.

  • If used by Selector, it replaces the text of the provided object with a CuteTime.
  • If used as a function, it returns a string containing a CuteTime version of the provided timestamp.
$('.timestamp').cuteTime();
$('.timestamp').cuteTime({ /* OPTIONS * / });

cutetime_object = $('.timestamp').cuteTime();
cutetime_object.update_cuteness();

$.cuteTime('2009/10/12 22:11:19');
$.cuteTime({ /* OPTIONS * / }, '2009/10/12 22:11:19'); // [NEW!]

For more details about the latest CuteTime improvements and their implementation, visit http://tpgblog.com/CuteTime

If you find this useful, or have any questions, ideas, or issues, leave a comment.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

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jQuery Plugin: It’s CuteTime! (v 1.0.5) [UPDATE]

jquery-logo-256I am happy to announce the latest version of the CuteTime jQuery plugin.02_facebook-cutetime

CuteTime provides the ability to easily…

  • convert timestamps to ‘cuter’ language-styled forms (e.g. yesterday, 2 hours ago, last year, in the future!),
  • customize the time scales and output formatting, and
  • dynamically update the displayed CuteTime(s) upon request and/or automatically.

There was some excellent feedback from many of you following the initial release of CuteTime. And much of that feedback has been incorporated into this release.

Changes to Version 1.0.5…

  • updated the ‘cutetime’ attribute to use HTML 5 compliant ‘data-timestamp’ custom attribute
  • updates to settings are now non-constructive
  • added translations.txt to the bundle to store all contributed translations of the cuteness translations (special thanks to Vincent Rolfs for providing the first translation, German)
  • minified version now compiled using YUI Compressor

CuteTime is a customizable jQuery plugin that automatically converts timestamps to formats much cuter. Also has the ability to dynamically re-update and/or automatically update timestamps on a controlled interval.

If used by Selector, replaces the text of the provided object with a cuteTime.

If used as a function, returns a string containing a cuteTime version of the provided timestamp.

Implementation

$('.timestamp').cuteTime();
$('.timestamp').cuteTime({ /* OPTIONS * / });

cutetime_object = $('.timestamp').cuteTime();
cutetime_object.update_cuteness();

$.cuteTime('2009/10/12 22:11:19');

For more details about CuteTime and its implementation, visit http://tpgblog.com/CuteTime

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

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jQuery Plugin: It’s CuteTime!

jquery-logo-256 02_facebook-cutetime Many online social products, and more continue to, avoid a formal timestamp format…

2009-10-10 23:14:17 and Thu, October 29, 2004 12:14:19 PM

… opting for more user friendly, “warm and fuzzy,” human-readable styles…

9 days ago and 5 years ago.

As a result, and also in my quest to always help provide my clients free, cheap and easy to use tools, I have been on the lookout for a jQuery plugin that would provide the ability to easily…01_digg-cutetime

  • convert timestamps to ‘cuter’ language-styled forms (e.g. yesterday, 2 hours ago, last year, in the future!),
  • customize the time scales and output formatting, and
  • dynamically update the displayed CuteTime(s) upon request and/or automatically.

While there are other similar tools out there in JavaScript, PHP, and, I am sure, many other languages, none adequately met my goals. Therefore, I created the jQuery CuteTime plugin.

Usage

CuteTime is a customizable jQuery plugin (jQuery.cuteTime) that automatically converts timestamps to formats much cuter. Also, it has the ability to dynamically re-update and/or automatically update timestamps on a controlled interval.

As a Function

If used as a function, a string containing a cuteTime version of the provided timestamp is returned.

$(document).ready(function () {
	// timestamp MUST be a valid Date().parse 'able' format
	$.cuteTime('2009/10/12 22:11:19');
});
<html>
	<body>
		<div class='predetermined'></div>
	</body>
</html>


As a Method

If used via Selector, CuteTime replaces the text of the provided object with a cuteTime.

$(document).ready(function () {
	$('.timestamp').cuteTime();
});
<html>
	<body>
		<div class="timestamp">
			2009/10/12 22:11:19
		</div>
		<div class="timestamp">
			2008/11/01 07:11:00
		</div>
		<div class="timestamp">
			2018/11/01 07:11:00
		</div>
		<div class="timestamp"></div>
		<div class="timestamp" cutetime="1980/10/12 22:11:19">
			2009/10/12 22:11:19
		</div>
		<div class="timestamp" cutetime="asd">
			10/12/2009 22:11:19
		</div>
		<div class="timestamp" cutetime="asd">
			aoisd
		</div>
		<div class="timestamp" cutetime="asd"></div>
	</body>
</html>

When initialized, the cuteTime() call either updates or assigns the ‘cutetime’ attribute to the provided objects. Method implementation supports chaining, returning the jQuery object.

e.g. <div class=’timestamp’ cutetime=’2009 10 12 22:11:19′>2009 10 12 22:11:19</div>

If the cutetime attribute already exists within the provided object, then the text within the object is ignored in the cutification process. If the cutetime attribute does not exist or an invalid one is provided, then a valid cutetime attribute is assigned to the object.

If the cutetime attribute is missing, then it is calculated from the text of the provided object.

If neither cutetime attribute nor valid object text exist, then the timestamp is assumed to be ‘now’.

When using CuteTime in the form…

<br />
$(document).ready(function () {
	remember_the_cuteness = $('.timestamp').cuteTime();
});

… the following methods can be used …

// stops all automatic updates of refresh-enabled timestamps
remember_the_cuteness.stop_cuteness();

// (re)starts the automatic updating of timestamps
// REMINDER: make sure refresh is set to > 0
remember_the_cuteness.start_cuteness();

// updates timestamps of the provided objects
remember_the_cuteness.update_cuteness();

Settings

By default, automatic updating is disabled and the following CuteTimes can be displayed…

the future!
just now
a few seconds ago
a minute ago
x minutes ago
an hour ago
x hours ago
yesterday
x days ago
last month
x months ago
last year
x years ago

To change these settings, they can either be accessed directly…

$.fn.cuteTime.settings.refresh = 10000;

… or at the time of initialization …

my_cutetime = $('.timestamp_move').cuteTime({ refresh: 60000*10 });

The default settings data structure is…

$.fn.cuteTime.settings = {
	refresh: -1,			// time in milliseconds before next refresh of page data; -1 == no refresh
	time_ranges: [
		{bound: NEG_INF,	// IMPORANT: bounds MUST be in ascending order, from negative infinity to positive infinity
			cuteness: 'the future!',			unit_size: 0},
		{bound: 0,
			cuteness: 'just now',				unit_size: 0},
		{bound: 20 * 1000,
			cuteness: 'a few seconds ago',		unit_size: 0},
		{bound: 60 * 1000,
			cuteness: 'a minute ago',			unit_size: 0},
		{bound: 60 * 1000 * 2,
			cuteness: ' minutes ago',			unit_size: 60 * 1000},
		{bound: 60 * 1000 * 60,
			cuteness: 'an hour ago',			unit_size: 0},
		{bound: 60 * 1000 * 60 * 2,
			cuteness: ' hours ago',				unit_size: 60 * 1000 * 60},
		{bound: 60 * 1000 * 60 * 24,
			cuteness: 'yesterday',				unit_size: 0},
		{bound: 60 * 1000 * 60 * 24 * 2,
			cuteness: ' days ago',				unit_size: 60 * 1000 * 60 * 24},
		{bound: 60 * 1000 * 60 * 24 * 30,
			cuteness: 'last month',				unit_size: 0},
		{bound: 60 * 1000 * 60 * 24 * 30 * 2,
			cuteness: ' months ago',			unit_size: 60 * 1000 * 60 * 24 * 30},
		{bound: 60 * 1000 * 60 * 24 * 30 * 12,
			cuteness: 'last year',				unit_size: 0},
		{bound: 60 * 1000 * 60 * 24 * 30 * 12 * 2,
			cuteness: ' years ago',				unit_size: 60 * 1000 * 60 * 24 * 30 * 12},
		{bound: POS_INF,
			cuteness: 'a blinkle ago',			unit_size: 0}
	]
};

The parameters are defined (and all can be overridden) thus…

  • refresh
    • time in milliseconds before next refresh of page data;
    • a value of -1 disables refreshing
  • time_ranges
    • the array of bound_structures that delineate the cute descriptions associated with time_ranges
    • time_range’s boundary structures consist of the following variables…
  • time_range[x].bound
    • the value is an integer representing the time difference between the provided timestamp and now
    • the lower inclusive bound, or starting point, for using the ‘cuteness’ string that describes the current timestamp
    • the exclusive upper bound is defined by the next boundary structure definition in the time_ranges array [current boundary + 1]
  • time_range[x].cuteness
    • string to use in place of the current timestamp (e.g. ‘yesterday’)
  • time_range[x].unit_size
    • the integer divisor in milliseconds to apply to the calculated time difference
    • if unit_size > 0 then a number value is prepended to the cuteness string as calculated by time_difference / unit_size (e.g. 4 hours ago)
    • if unit_size = 0, then no number is prepended to the cuteness string (e.g. an hour ago)

BTW

Make sure you use timestamps that are fully recognized by the JavaScript Date object’s Parse method in all the IE and FF browser versions you want to support. Otherwise, prepare for a headache. ;-)

Get It

You can download CuteTime, dual licensed under GPL and MIT, from…

jQuery Repository
http://plugins.jquery.com/project/CuteTime

Git
Public Clone URL: git://github.com/theproductguy/CuteTime.git
GitHub: http://github.com/theproductguy/CuteTime

Zip
jQuery.cuteTime_source-bundle_1.0_20091019.zip

Demo

http://theproductguy.com/cutetime/cutetime.demo.html

Status updates can be found here, jQuery CuteTime.
If you find this useful, or have any questions, ideas, or issues, leave a comment.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

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Quick-UX Credibility from Likexo to Etsy

As a brief postscript to the series exploring Quick-UX and Credibility I would like to share a back of napkin sketch that I made at the beginning of the process that helped structure the series; and that I feel would be most instructive.

credibility-napkin-sketch_thumb[3]

This series’ exploration of Credibility has been a long one, but not an undeserving subject. Credibility, and being able to quickly assess it for an online product, is critical in the increasingly complex ‘web of apps.’

Likexo

00_likexo_homepage_thumb[4] 
(before / after)

None / Average
0 / 0.75

No Obvious Typos

no / yes

General Contact Info Provided

no / yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

no / yes

Physical Address

no

About Us with Team Member Bios

no / yes

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

no / yes

ConvertFiles

00_convertfiles_homepage_thumb[2] 

(Barely) Low
0.325

No Obvious Typos

yes

General Contact Info Provided

yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

no

Physical Address

no

About Us with Team Member Bios

no

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

no

IndyBudget

06_indybudget_homepage_thumb[2] 

(Barely) Low
0.325

No Obvious Typos

yes

General Contact Info Provided

yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

no

Physical Address

no

About Us with Team Member Bios

no

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

no

ToRSS

04_torss_homepage_thumb[2] 

(Barely) Low
0.325

No Obvious Typos

yes

General Contact Info Provided

yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

no

Physical Address

no

About Us with Team Member Bios

no

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

no

Chart.ly

00_chartly_homepage_thumb[2] 

(Solidly) Low
0.325

No Obvious Typos

yes

General Contact Info Provided

yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

no

Physical Address

no

About Us with Team Member Bios

no

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

no

Pogby

00_pogby_homepage_thumb[2] 
(before / after)

(Solidly) Low / Average
0.325 / 0.75

No Obvious Typos

yes

General Contact Info Provided

yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

no / yes

Physical Address

no

About Us with Team Member Bios

no / yes

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

no / yes

TechCrunch

00_techcrunch_home_thumb[2] 

Average
0.45

No Obvious Typos

yes

General Contact Info Provided

yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

no

Physical Address

no

About Us with Team Member Bios

yes

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

no

Mashable

00_mashable_homepage_thumb[2] 

Average
0.575

No Obvious Typos

yes

General Contact Info Provided

yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

no

Physical Address

no

About Us with Team Member Bios

yes

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

yes

GigaOM

00_gigaom_homepage_thumb[2] 

Average
0.625

No Obvious Typos

yes

General Contact Info Provided

yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

yes

Physical Address

no

About Us with Team Member Bios

yes

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

no

ThumbTack

00_thumbtack_homepage_thumb[2] 

Average
0.75

No Obvious Typos

yes

General Contact Info Provided

yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

yes

Physical Address

yes

About Us with Team Member Bios

no

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

no

MakingOf

00_makingof_homepage_thumb[2] 

Average
0.45

No Obvious Typos

yes

General Contact Info Provided

yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

no

Physical Address

no

About Us with Team Member Bios

yes

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

no

Etsy

00_etsy_homepage_thumb[2] 

High
0.825

No Obvious Typos

yes

General Contact Info Provided

yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

no

Physical Address

yes

About Us with Team Member Bios

yes

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

yes

Quick-UX Credibility

No Obvious Typos

+0.15

General Contact Info Provided

+0.175

Telephone Contact Info Provided

+0.175

Physical Address

+0.25

About Us with Team Member Bios

+0.125

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

+0.125

Quick & Useful

Quick-UX Credibility is a measure of the starting point, the foundation of a product’s Credibility. How products, and the people behind them, strengthen, or erode, their trustworthiness through their subsequent actions governs the Credibility imparted to the product’s consumers over time, through extended exposure to the product. However, this extended exposure is only achievable after these products have successfully enticed and converted their visitors into returning readers, by way of a comprehensive User Experience, in significant part due to an initial demonstration (or lack) of Credibility.

And until next week, when the exploration and discussion of products, user experience, modular innovation, startups, or perhaps something quite new, enjoy reviewing the products and ensuing discussions of this series, and see you then.

 

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

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UPDATE: Refreshed Likexo

Quick-UX provides for the rapid, simple and quantifiable assessment of a product’s User Experience (UX). In answering the question of Usefulness, "Should I use it?" the sub-category of Credibility is one in the frequent discussion of cautious engagement, especially in the ever increasing, in both frequency and size, waves of introductions of online products.

Quick-UX is a method that I have developed and refined over time and frequently utilize when quick assessments are best suited to the task.

Quick Indeed

In this latest series on Credibility, 2 products were chosen as worthy representatives of specific Credibility values, and explored in the articles…

Unbelievable Likexo, and

Puzzling Pogby.

And, shortly, excitingly, after these articles were posted I received appreciative comments from their respective CEO’s, as well as an invitation to take a look at the rapid improvements to their products that these articles spawned. This week, I decided to revisit Likexo.

Real Progress

The earlier state of the Likexo product resulted in an assessment of No Credibility and a Quick-UX Credibility value of0 (zero).

00_new-likexo_homepage

I received heartfelt email from Cristian Venture, CEO at Likexo.com…

"Hello Jeremy,

I’m Cristian Ventura, from Likexo (yes, i am a real person! ;-)) and i have read your blog post about Credibility (that one in that you kill us ;-)), and I wanna thank you about that.

Reading your post was very hard, but as any member of the Likexo team, I really appreciate all the feedback that help us to grow (at least) any little step.

We are a really early Start Up, and we know that we have a lot of work to do to improve our site, but we are really passionate about our job! :-)

In this week (with other features) we improved the "about us" of our site, and we like to show you the new info about us.

Thanks for get the time to inspect Likexo and give us our feedback. If you got more things to comment about Likexo or how can we improve some things, are you free to contact us. :-)

Regards,

Cristian Ventura

CEO @ Likexo.com "

… to which I could do nothing short of taking an eager look at the latest improvements. The results of the evaluation and side-by-side, before and after, comparison follows.

Rule

Value

Before Changes

After Changes

No Obvious Typos

+0.15

no

yes

General Contact Info Provided

+0.175

no

yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

+0.175

no

yes

Physical Address

+0.25

no

no

About Us w/ Team Member Bios

+0.125

no

yes

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

+0.125

no

yes

       

Total

 

0

0.75

Credibility

 

None

Average

The before and after results are as different as night and day. Likexo went from a product presenting an air of dubiousness to one emanating solid credibility.

Not only do all the previously found typos appear to be eliminated, but…

…general and telephone contact information is readily accessible on the ‘About us’ page, and…

01_new-likexo_contact

…background and direct contact information for the Likexo team is provided.

02_new-likexo_team

Somewhat Direct

The downside to the direct contact information is that you have to be logged-in to see and avail oneself of it. Such a direct means of contact is borderline acceptable in meeting the requirement for ‘team member bios with direct contact information’ (It would be much better to always see the ‘Contact’ button, even if the non-logged-in user, upon clicking this button, is immediately prompted to log-in. Even better — let people, logged-in and not, be able to directly contact team members.)

Awesome!

This outstanding improvement is a great demonstration of just how easy, with passionate and eager people behind a real product, it is for products to create that sound foundation of Credibility upon which to build a company and a brand. I am, for one, looking forward to many new and exciting developments coming out of Likexo as they evolve and grow.

And perhaps best summed up in the words of Cristian Ventura, Likexo’s CEO,

“Quick-UX in particular is very quick and simple, and can serve as a guide to improve many products."

"Likexo is an early stage start-up, and we know that we have many things to improve every day, but we are making a great effort to create an application in which people can find useful information and express all the things that they like."

Quick & Useful

Throughout this series I have been exploring and ins-and-outs of Credibility, walking through real-world examples of the Quick-UX evaluation of Credibility

No Credibility
Barely Low Credibility (part 1, 2, 3)
Solidly Low Credibility (part 1, 2)
Average Credibility & Tech News (part 1, 2, 3)
More Average Credibility (part 1, 2)
High Credibility

Update: Renewed Pogby
Update: Likexo

Quick-UX Credibility, In Conclusion

Subscribe now (click here) to make sure you don’t miss any part of this series exploring the Usefulness and Credibility components of Quick-UX, the quick and easy method of generating quantifiable and comparable metrics representing the understanding of the overall User Experience of a product, as well as other insightful posts from The Product Guy.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn

The Product Guy

Add to Social Bookmarks: Stumbleupon Del.ico.us Furl Reddit Google Add to Mixx!

UPDATE: Pogby Renewed

Quick-UX provides for the rapid, simple and quantifiable assessment of a product’s User Experience (UX). In answering the question of Usefulness, "Should I use it?" the sub-category of Credibility is one in the frequent discussion of cautious engagement, especially in the ever increasing, in both frequency and size, waves of introductions of online products.

Quick-UX is a method that I have developed and refined over time and frequently utilize when quick assessments are best suited to the task.

Quick Indeed

In this latest series on Credibility, 2 products were chosen as worthy representatives of specific Credibility values, and explored in the articles…

Unbelievable Likexo, and
Puzzling Pogby.

And, shortly, excitingly, after these articles were posted, I received appreciative comments from their respective CEO’s, as well as an invitation to take a look at the rapid improvements to their products that these articles spawned. This week, I decided to revisit Pogby.

Stepping Forward

The earlier state of the Pogby product resulted in an assessment of Low Credibility and a Quick-UX Credibility value of0.325.

00_new-pogby_homepage

Spurred onward by Pogby CEO, Josh Gooch’s message…

"We made some rapid changes last night. Please check it out when you have a chance. Appreciate the feedback – josh"

… I decided to see how these changes stacked up and look at their impact on the product’s overall Credibility (if any). The results of the evaluation and side-by-side, before and after, comparison follows.

Rule

Value

Before Changes

After Changes

No Obvious Typos

+0.15

yes

yes

General Contact Info Provided

+0.175

yes

yes

Telephone Contact Info Provided

+0.175

no

yes

Physical Address

+0.25

no

no

About Us w/ Team Member Bios

+0.125

no

yes

Team Member Bios have Direct Contact Information

+0.125

no

yes

       

Total

 

0.325

0.75

Credibility

 

Solidly Low

Average

Kudos to the Pogby team in addressing the issues that the Quick-UX analysis along the variable of Credibility was able to provide.

Special Note

Particularly well executed is the new ‘Who We Are’ page, with background information for the team, and direct contact email address provided to both the CEO and Chief Architect.

01_new-pogby_who

In the previous article I took particular note of the awkward content and structure of the header region.

04_pogby_ad

But, now users are presented with a very much welcomed and improved header region for this product, negating the previous confusion of ownership, sponsorship, advertising, etc.,

  • Labeling, prominently, the ‘Featured Venue’, and
  • Providing clear separation between venue and the product’s name / logo.

02_new-pogby_header

Broadly Speaking

Recently, I caught up with Josh Gooch, CEO of Pogby, and we discussed the broader impact of, and his thoughts about, Quick-UX. Out of this exchange there were some important points that Josh sought to make, and I am flattered to share…

“All the evaluation was terrific! I am thankful you are out there taking the time to provide guidance. You have a solid methodology and are trying to provide guidance to companies that may not fully understand how to best relate to customers of their site. It was honestly an honor that you did this for our site. It was great direction that you provided and we rapidly worked to improve things. Your points were all accurate and supported gaining Credibility. All of the content you’ve written has been a great guide for us.”

…and on companies, from big to small, and whether or not they should use Quick-UX…

“Absolutely. We are a startup, so the feedback is key … especially when you don’t have a full-time staff focused on the website. But, bigger companies seem to struggle with this (too) … it is whether or not the company has an interest (or feels the value) in making changes …”

Great Work!

Resulting from an analysis that took minutes, Pogby was able to take focused, quick action, and implement changes with a significant impact on this product and its Credibility.

Quick & Useful

Throughout this series I have been exploring and ins-and-outs of Credibility, walking through real-world examples of the Quick-UX evaluation of Credibility

No Credibility
Barely Low Credibility (part 1, 2, 3)
Solidly Low Credibility (part 1, 2)
Average Credibility & Tech News (part 1, 2, 3)
More Average Credibility (part 1, 2)
High Credibility

Update: Renewed Pogby
Update: Likexo

Quick-UX Credibility, In Conclusion

Subscribe now (click here) to make sure you don’t miss any part of this series exploring the Usefulness and Credibility components of Quick-UX, the quick and easy method of generating quantifiable and comparable metrics representing the understanding of the overall User Experience of a product, as well as other insightful posts from The Product Guy.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

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