The Product Jobs [Update]

tpj-logo-w_lkw_thumb1_thumb_thumb_thSince launching The Product Jobs, several months ago, to freely connect product job seekers and those looking to hire great product people there have been over 800 product job postings!

Today, I am very pleased to be announcing some new features…

  • Social sharing of cool and interesting jobs
    • If you see a job that someone in your social sphere may find interesting, or wish to clue in your friend on a great new opportunity for their career, you can now easily share the posting with him / her via Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus
  • Easier Applicant Management
    • For job posters, all applicants, along with their application dates, resume, and cover letter information, are now called out in the “My Job Posts” section and selectable within the new applicant section at the bottom of the corresponding job post.

It can be hard to find a product job, harder to find the right product person. I get it. This has been my experience, as well as that of scores of others.

Visit http://TheProductJobs.com today.

The Product Jobs is FREE for all! Just create an account to apply to, or post, a new PRODUCT position.

IMG_2282I believe in a growing and vibrant product person community. That is why I created The Product Jobs as well as founded The Product Group, the largest product management meetup in the world, providing product people of all types a laid-back conversational place to go to network, learn, and talk.

I hope you enjoy these new features for TheProductJobs.com and benefit from it as much as I enjoyed building it.  Please help me in spreading the word of this resource for the Product community, enjoy, and happy hunting!

Thanks.

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

About these ads

The Product Jobs

tpj-logo-w_lkwI believe in a growing and vibrant product person community. That is, in part, why I founded The Product Group, the largest product management meetup in the world, providing product people of all types a laid-back conversational place to go to network, learn, and talk. It is out of this endeavor a new product idea was sparked.

IMG_2164Members of The Product Group are constantly asking me for advice and assistance in getting into Product Management or finding their next Product job, or for recommendations for a great product person. It can be hard to find a product job, harder to find the right product person. I get it. This has been my experience, as well as that of scores of others.

Today, I am very proud to announce the official launch of The Product Jobs for product job seekers and those looking to hire great product people.

Visit http://TheProductJobs.com today.

The Product Jobs is FREE for all! Just create an account to apply to, or post, a new PRODUCT position.

Please help me in spreading the word of this new resource for the Product community, enjoy, and happy hunting.

Thanks.

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

The Product Mentor

TPM-Short3-LogoWhen I started as a product person, there was no one I could go to for product management advice. Heck, most people didn’t even know what a product manager was.

Product Community Improvements

Sharing advice and experiences amongst diverse and smart product people is the single largest reason I founded The Product Group; providing product people of all types a laid-back conversational place to go to network, learn, and talk.

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With all the progress the community has made over the past several years, finding and connecting with a product management mentor, someone you can meet with one-on-one to do everything from sharing product insights to receiving career advice, still proves challenging for many.

The Product Mentor

That’s why, today, I am proud to announce the launching of this new community initiative, a mentorship program to connect product management mentors with those seeking mentorship.

http://TheProductMentor.com

It Takes 2

If you are interested in being a product management mentor or mentee click through The Product Mentor to sign-up today.

Enjoy & spread the word. (TWEET)

BTW, many have signed up earlier and can expect the screening / interview process of mentors and mentees to commence very shortly. We will always have more mentees than mentors, so if you know of someone looking to give back to the community, please forward along this information. (TWEET)

Thanks!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

Announcing the 3rd Annual Award for The Best Product Person!

TBPP2012_alt-abrv-114 Established in 2010, The Best Product Person (#TBPP) is the leading international award honoring excellence in Product Management.

Submit your nomination for TBPP today!
http://tbpp.wufoo.com/forms/the-best-product-person-of-2012/

Winners are awarded and invited to speak and share their knowledge and experience with the larger product community. Nominees are evaluated in the areas of: Becoming a Product Person, Your Product, Advice to Product People, and Product Management Trends.  This year, the person who nominates the winner shall also receive a prize!

Past winners of The Best Product Person…

2012
Nominate TBPP Now (prize: MORE AWESOME THAN EVER!)

2011
Chris Sarette of Invisible Children (prize: "Making Ideas Happen")

2010
Giff Constable of Aprizi (prize: Mental Notes from Stephen Anderson)

The only eligibility requirement is being an awesome Product Person! Anyone can nominate! Reminder: You can only nominate someone you personally know.

Please submit your nomination today! There are prizes and so much more!

http://tbpp.wufoo.com/forms/the-best-product-person-of-2012/

For more information about TBPP 2012: http://tpgblog.com/tbpp

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

Happy New Year! Product Management in 2012

2012Happy New Year! The last year has seen many changes in the world of product management. Yet, with all these changes, we can all expect ever more exciting trends, processes, and, especially, products in 2012!

A Look Back

In 2011, many of the prevailing trends we experienced were…

  • Increased focus on process for innovation and ideation
  • API’s, relationships, modular innovation, integration. You are not a true product unless you have an API.
  • Decreasing use of the free service / product business model. Growing on free is no longer the best policy. You can actually create a viable, sustainable business by charging customers money. (omg)
  • The new form factor — the tablet. While it has been around for sometime, the tablet (specifically, the iPad) has had a profound affect on not just tablet design, but all product design and product-consumer expectations of interaction — more intuitive, more touchy.

The Coming Year

It’s always fun to attempt to predict the future. Based on my interactions with the product management community, the following are my predictions for the big trends of 2012.

  • Offline. There will be a broad-based movement back to enabling the offline application, powered by HTML5, from document management to media consumption.
  • Death of XML. XML is on the wane, and JSON’s time has come. With all of the frameworks that have been developed to extract, transform, and transport XML, there will be great entrepreneurial opportunities in 2012 tooling-up JSON.
  • The number of product management roles will continue to grow. However, they will be filled by more and more junior people. These positions will also focus much more on the tactical side of product management (vs. the strategic).
  • In demand skills of the product manager of 2012 (and beyond)…
    • Tech / programming. There will be increasing need for technical experience or programming skills for product manager roles (even UX centric ones).
    • Statistics. Establishing and gathering metrics will become increasingly central to what it means to be a product manager. You need to demonstrate your value and make smarter decisions. (One of the key drivers has been the growth of Lean Methodology.)
  • Customer driven roadmapping will gain increasing momentum. And, mirroring that trend, but inward facing, more company-wide integrated product management will be taking shape.

What’s next?

What are your predictions and expected trends for product management in 2012?

Enjoy & thanks to everyone who followed, read, and participated in The Product Guy blog and The Product Group, new and old, in 2011! We are going to have a supremely awesome 2012!!! See you there!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

The Best Product Person of 2011 is…

The Best Product Person of 2011 nominations have begun!

To nominate someone you think should be recognized as The Best Product Person of 2011:

Submit your nomination’s…

  1. name,
  2. a paragraph as to why you think they are The Best Product Person of 2011, and
  3. how they can be contacted.

You must know the Product Person, as they can expect to be contacted by me to speak with them further for consideration as The Best Product Person.

And, yes, you can nominate yourself.

At the end of the year, the winner will be selected and they will receive “something special” (to be announced very soon).

Submit your nomination today!

I am looking forward to seeing how this turns out. And, do spread the word of this new contest — the more the merrier for everyone involved.

A Look Back…

The Best Product Person of 2010 is Giff Constable of Aprizi.

TBPP2010_alt-abrv-114Giff’s career path has traveled that of entrepreneur, artist, and investment banker — no doubt, all contributing to his outstanding product person success. He has spoken about cutting edge technology at major conferences like NRF and GDC, as well as through media outlets such as Business Week, New York Times, CNBC, NPR, ABC News, and Reuters. For more about Giff Constable, check out his blog @ http://giffconstable.com/.

Runner-up is Paul Gray of Brainmates. Paul Gray has spent ten years working in the entertainment, media and communications industries within Australia and Europe. Paul worked in both B2B and B2C roles for organizations including Disney, Foxtel, and British Telecom.

Sketching a Path Forward

sketch-forwardDon’t debate the debaters, but instead, influence the influencers.

Product managers are leaders and influencers of features, ideas, and epic tasks. Some have direct and backed authority, many others have variants that are partial or merely implicit. Either way, to achieve the greatest success, do you rule with force? Or influence, and guide, and allow for shared discovery in support of your product’s end goals?

Functional Forms

When your designer says “no”… how do you get them to “yes”? Let’s look at this challenge with respect to a few designer types that many of us have had the pleasure and privilege of working with.

The Perfectionist
The Innovator

This week, let’s take a look at…

The Mixologist
The Standard Bearer

The Mixologist

The Mixologist may lack vision or a good stream of resources. No problem.

Influence the sources. If the sources are blogs, suggest other blogs more inline with your desired approaches. If the sources are people, work with them, share your vision, share your perspectives, recommendations, creativity, logic and reasoning. Build relationships and foster broad support from below. Tread lightly here; you do not want to offend The Mixologist by overstepping or allowing any of your relationship building to be construed as anything threatening.

When The Mixologist is aligned with your goals and proposing ideas you have pitched and sought, get your ego out of the way… #1 is always to achieve the business objective. And, if you have built sound relationships, the right people will know where the credit truly belongs. Oh yeah… and frequent lunches with The Mixologist help too.

The Standard Bearer

“Standards are great, because there are so many to choose from.”

There are a ton of standards out there. For every standard, there is another competing one. Identify the competition, share it around the organization. Build support for the new standard, or at least for a willingness to experiment with it. Let those new supporters become the advocates of the new thinking. Foster an environment where multiple ideas, multiple standards can co-exist and compete on objective measures. Encourage and reward the experimentation with competing standards as well as non-standard concepts. Standards are great; they can always be improved.

Designers are people, too.

Yep. And, they too, do not often fit a simple character description. Most designers are a mix of traits, some potentially described here.

Generally speaking, the best influencer, the one to really buddy up to, is statistics– they can often be your best influencer and supporter in most cases. Collect the data, find the data, and introduce the data (“your key influencer”) to your designer and together understand it, explore it, and challenge yourselves to build upon it.

Over the next few weeks, we will be discussing various examples and approaches in wielding strategic influence as a successful product manager.

Subscribe now (click here) to make sure you don’t miss any part of this series, as well as other insightful posts from The Product Guy.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

The Pixel Perfectionist

pixel-pefectDon’t debate the debaters, but instead, influence the influencers.

Product managers are leaders and influencers of features, ideas, and epic tasks. Some have direct and backed authority, many others have variants that are partial or merely implicit. Either way, to achieve the greatest success, do you rule with force? Or influence, and guide, and allow for shared discovery in support of your product’s end goals?

Functional Forms

When your designer says “no”… how do you get them to “yes”? Let’s look at this challenge with respect to a few designer types that many of us have had the pleasure and privilege of working with.

The Perfectionist
The Innovator
The Mixologist
The Standard Barer

The Perfectionist

Perhaps your idea isn’t perfect, or is suffering from The Perfectionist’s attempt for design perfection. Or, perhaps, the design is spiraling into endless edge case bottomless pits of despair.

The Perfectionist can be difficult to influence by anyone less perfect than themselves (nearly everyone else). You may recognize The Perfectionist by these additional traits…

  • Has to be in control
  • Gets carried away with the details
  • Frequently criticizes others
  • Refuses to hear criticism
  • Checks up on other people’s work
  • Has a hard time making choices

Leverage the Peer Group

At their core, The Perfectionist seeks acceptance and approval. Encourage praise from their peers and coworkers for their work; satisfaction breeds productivity and openness to more ideas (especially those that may have received firm “no’s” in the past)

Create an environment that rewards good ideas. Perfectionism can often be curbed through healthy, time-constrained competition – encourage speed and near perfection over 100% and lagging delivery. A mix of some competition with other individuals / groups coupled with tracking and metrics can help lower the individual’s reservations about taking risks while simultaneously establishing a structure for setting and achieving more realistic goals.

The Innovator

Innovator may find your ideas too bland and normal… that’s fine, provide avenues for their creative spirit.

The Innovator can be pushing the limits of design so far that their designs lose the ability to communicate form and function, usable value. The Innovator often seeks to inspire, rather than motivate – motivate the product users to action, to buy, to come back.

Set objective, measurable goals. For example, change the challenge from improving usability by moving the login button to a new location, to increase the rate of logins by 20% and time on the website by 40% for each logged in user. When you redefine the problem in these terms, you then empower The Innovator to iterate, to innovate, to dazzle, to do whatever they can envision… as long, at the end of the day, the goals are met.

Over the next few weeks, we will be discussing various examples and approaches in wielding strategic influence as a successful product manager. Next week, we will look at …

The Mixologist
The Standard Barer

Subscribe now (click here) to make sure you don’t miss any part of this series, as well as other insightful posts from The Product Guy.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

Draw in the Designers

imageDon’t debate the debaters, but instead, influence the influencers.

Product managers are leaders and influencers of features, ideas, and epic tasks. Some have direct and backed authority, many others have variants that are partial or merely implicit. Either way, to achieve the greatest success, do you rule with force? Or influence, and guide, and allow for shared discovery in support of your product’s end goals?

Let’s Take Designers

There are all types of designers. To describe a few…

The Perfectionist

Can often get lost in the weeds and minutia. They may even often fail at the on time delivery of a product since, for them, nothing less than 100% perfect will do.

The Innovator

A genius at creating new design patterns; and is always trying to work them into every corner of the product design. They seek to establish previously unexperienced trends. And, they may see themselves more as an artist than as a designer working to meet the business requirements of customers, or product managers.

The Mixologist

They take, borrow, improve ideas of their own, from their team, peers, as well as, from outside the company (blogs, designers, books, websites, …). They may not be doing the heavy lifting, but, make no mistakes, they are the design conductor behind the scenes.

The Standard Barer

This individual of rigorous ideals, follows only the establish design patterns — shirking from trying the untried ideas. Often they end up following these standards to a fault, impinging innovation and other business goals.

The Problem

Your designer doesn’t want to make the changes to the UI that you think will provide additional business value, through usability, productivity, better experience, …

What do you do? Twist an arm? Or, understand the individual, and influence the influencers?

What’s your advice for these and other types of designers?

Over the next few weeks, we will be discussing various examples and approaches in wielding strategic influence as a successful product manager.

Subscribe now (click here) to make sure you don’t miss any part of this series, as well as other insightful posts from The Product Guy.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy

Strategic Influence of a Product Manager

Team-leaderDon’t debate the debaters, but instead, influence the influencers.

Product managers are leaders and influencers of features, ideas, and epic tasks. Some have direct and backed authority, many others have variants that are partial or merely implicit. Either way, to achieve the greatest success, do you rule with force? Or influence, and guide, and allow for shared discovery in support of your product’s end goals?

Dream On

A path of unquestioned authority over all product decisions may be many a Product Manager’s dream. ;-)  Those that chose this seemingly easier path, will, at best, yield short- or medium-term results.

It’s the People, Stupid!

Any good product manager knows that to be successful they must manage, directly and indirectly, a great diversity of people and their backgrounds, personalities, and skill-sets. Many individuals that do not lend to being told what must be done are more yielding to a path of inclusion and self-discovery.

Over the next few weeks, we will be discussing various examples and approaches in wielding strategic influence as a successful product manager.

Subscribe now (click here) to make sure you don’t miss any part of this series, as well as other insightful posts from The Product Guy.

Enjoy!

Jeremy Horn
The Product Guy